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BCLA BUSN 3375 Syllabus

Marketing and Distribution Channels

This course will explore the fact that today, most brands make their offerings available through multiple distribution channels and demonstrate how a brands channel strategy may also act as a key differentiator. Students will develop an understanding of how brands can distinguish themselves competitively while taking multichannel marketing, managing of channel conflict, disintermediation, and push vs. pull marketing efforts in the channel into consideration. (Pending SOR approval)

SDNY PSYC 3361 Syllabus

Abnormal Psychology

This course will introduce the psychological, biological, and experiential factors thought to influence the symptoms, etiology, course/prognosis, and treatment of mental disorders in adults. Students will develop an understanding of the rationale for the diagnostic criteria and other clinical signs accompanying common DSM-5 disorders; causal and maintenance factors of disorders; and examples of empirically supported treatments. (Pending SOR approval)

SHGH CHIN 3310 Syllabus

Advanced Chinese 3 Credit

This course is designed for students who already have completed an intermediate level of Chinese language and can communicate in Mandarin about most daily topics without much difficulty. Students will continue to improve their Mandarin levels in reading, writing, listening, and speaking in a collaborative learning environment to master the strategy of communication and expression; develop a deeper understanding of Chinese culture and society; and have opportunities to practice their language skills both in class and in real life situations.

SDNY URBS 3345 Syllabus

Analyzing and Exploring the Global City - Sydney

This course will introduce the impact of globalization on Sydney. Students will explore Sydney's development, from early Indigenous connections to Sydney as tribal country, the establishment of a colonial outpost of the British Empire, through to the multicultural metropolis it is today; examine how colonization, migration, economic modernization, and globalization have affected the city and its inhabitants; develop an understanding of changing dynamics and identities of communities within Sydney; and analyze forces that have shaped Sydney’s relationship with Asia and the rest of the world.

BCLA URBS 3345 Syllabus

Analyzing and Exploring the Global City: Barcelona

Cities around the world are striving to be ‘global’; Barcelona, the capital of Catalunya, is one of the largest and most cosmopolitan cities in Spain. It is globally-renowned for its art and architecture, possessing no fewer than nine UNESCO-designated ‘world heritage’ sites, and has become a major destination for global tourism. In this interdisciplinary course, students will examine the emergence of this elegant, creative city as Spain’s gateway to the Mediterranean; analyze its history and evolution since its foundation by the Romans; explore the role of population dynamics, industrial change and globalization in shaping the city and the lives of its inhabitants; and investigate the ways in which the interplay of urbanism, politics, and society has addressed challenges of social, political, and technological change in the past and today.

BSAS URBS 3345 Syllabus

Analyzing and Exploring the Global City: Buenos Aires

This course will introduce the impact of globalization on Buenos Aires. Students will explore the establishment of Buenos Aires as Argentina’s gateway to the world, the impact of rapid population growth, and the influx of transnational organizations into the city; investigate major urban challenges facing the city today as a result; contextualize and develop informed interpretations of their personal experiences in Buenos Aires; and enhance their understanding of local history, politics, and society.

DBLN SOCY 3345 Syllabus

Analyzing and Exploring the Global City: Dublin

This course will introduce the impact of globalization on Dublin. Before exploring the city chronologically, students will examine ancient Ireland’s global influence, then re-trace the Viking City through to its current form, which is characterized by urban sprawl, multiculturalism, and its connection to Europe and the global economy; contextualize and develop informed interpretations of their personal experiences in Dublin; and develop a deeper understanding of Irish history, politics, and society.

LNDN URBS 3345 Syllabus

Analyzing and Exploring the Global City: London, Modernity, Empire, and Globalization

This course will introduce the impact of globalization on London, one of the world's most significant global cities, in comparative context. Students will examine London’s changing identity as a world city with a particular emphasis on comparing the city's imperial, postcolonial, and transatlantic connections, and the ways in which past and present, local and global intertwine in the capital. Students will combine classroom work with experiential learning, centred on field studies to areas such as Brixton, Spitalfields, Southbank, and the Olympic sites in East London.

SDNY FILM 2211 Syllabus

Australian Cinema - Representation and Identity

This course will examine the rich history of Australian cinema and its attempt to describe a uniquely Australian identity. Students will develop an understanding of the historical context of Australian cinema, from modes of production to distribution; investigate the notion of an Australian identity as it is expressed in some of the most significant films in the Australian tradition; compare and contrast Australian and US films; and consider the extent to which Australian films have reflected or determined Australian values

SDNY PSCI 3351 Syllabus

Australian Government and Politics in the Pacific Rim Context

This course will examine the government and politics of Australia and Australian engagement in the Asia-Pacific region. Students will analyze Australia’s similarities with and differences from the North American democratic model; explore Australia's substantial and abiding interests in the Asian region; develop an understanding of the magnitude of the influence that the Asia Pacific region has had on Australian foreign policy; and explore the continuing importance of cultural and political inheritance in the development of Australian public and foreign policy.

FLOR ITAL 1101 Syllabus

Beginner Italian Language 1

This course, designed for students with no prior knowledge of the Italian language, will focus on basic Italian language skills necessary to communicate clear messages in everyday life. Students will develop an understanding of the fundamental knowledge of grammar, phonetics, morphology, and syntax using a functional-situational approach where lessons will focus on real situation exercises, grammar drills, consolidation of material, and a deepening of concepts through readings, conversations, role playing games, and listening exercises to correct pronunciation.

FLOR ARTS 1103 Syllabus

Beginning Composition Drawing

This course will introduce students to fundamental approaches, techniques, tools, and mediums of drawing. Students will focus on various aspects of Florence as subject matter; enrich studio work with encounters with Florentine artists and through field studies; increase their visual awareness and perception; explore their creative potential and ability to make visual statements, while enjoying the challenge of drawing; and visually interpret examples of the impact of globalization in the urban environment through their artwork.

LNDN PSYC 3352 Syllabus

Child Development in a British Context

This course will investigate the aims and principles of developmental psychology as a scientific discipline, and describe the methods used to obtain knowledge about children and their development. Students will explore issues such as children's early attachments, the development of the self, the emergence of consciousness, and the role of play; develop an understanding of the role of education and child care practices and policies in the UK in shaping children's development; and examine childhood from historical, global, socio-cultural, and policy perspectives.

LNDN HSCI 3120 Syllabus

Comparative Healthcare Systems

This course will introduce the UK healthcare system and the context within which it operates. Students will explore the evolution of the National Health Service (NHS) from its inception in 1948 to present day; analyze case studies to compare the UK model of healthcare with other healthcare systems such as in the United States, France, Sweden, and lower income countries; develop an understanding of concepts and themes in comparative healthcare; and critically examine the role of governmental and non-governmental organizations in healthcare.

LNDN HSCI 3120 Syllabus

Comparative Healthcare Systems

This course will introduce the UK healthcare system and the context within which it operates. Students will explore the evolution of the National Health Service (NHS) from its inception in 1948 to present day; analyze case studies to compare the UK model of healthcare with other healthcare systems such as in the United States, France, Sweden, and lower income countries; develop an understanding of concepts and themes in comparative healthcare; and critically examine the role of governmental and non-governmental organizations in healthcare.

LNDN FILM 3311 Syllabus

Contemporary British Film

This course will chart the development of British film from 1994-2012, a period of confidence and success mirrored by a major structural and financial reorganization in the industry. Students will critically analyze key films and how they both emerge from and transform earlier British cinema tradition; develop an understanding of important British genres and film-making tropes; explore the ways in which British films reflect and respond to contemporary social and political conditions and events; and develop an awareness of specific ways in which UK and US film differs.

FLOR PSYC 3320 Syllabus

Cross Cultural Psychology

This course will explore the field of cross-cultural psychology through a focus on Italy and its inhabitants. Students will discuss aspects of cross-cultural analysis from the field of cross-cultural psychology, including cultural influence on human behavior, attitude, values, communication, and societal organization; examine topics of ethnocentrism, individual vs. collective societies, plural societies, cultural views on mental health, and intercultural communication; and investigate methodical issues of cross-cultural research, with the opportunity to be participant-observers of their own experiences in Italy, including through field work.

LNDN LGSL 3369

Cybersecurity and Privacy Regulation

Cybercrime is a global threat to national security, essential services, businesses and private individuals, costing billions of dollars in damage around the world. Recent years have seen significant growth in the scale and complexity of cyber criminality as cybercriminals are becoming more sophisticated in exploiting security vulnerabilities online, such as the massive breach of personal data stored online and recent coordinated ransomware campaigns against organizations around the world. Cybercrime is also transnational, with criminals and technical infrastructure operating across and between national jurisdictions, requiring international collaboration to combat multiple threats. This course examines current frameworks of US cyberlaw, procedures, key legal cases and their implications for future practice and policy, and compares and contrasts US, UK and EU law at the interface of criminal law, technology and information sciences. (Pending SOR approval)

LNDN FILM 3375 Syllabus

Digital Media Practice

This course will explore the digital media that permeate most social and economic interactions today, with a focus on digital media as a contemporary means of communication, placing them in the context of remix culture. Students will investigate still and moving images, which not only serve as entertainment, but also inform the way we communicate, learn about the world, purchase goods, and express our identities.

SHGH CHIN 1110 Syllabus

Elementary Chinese 3 Credit

This course, designed for students without previous knowledge of the Chinese language, will introduce the fundamentals of pronunciation, oral expression, reading, comprehension, and writing, with the greatest focus on spoken Mandarin. Students will develop basic Mandarin skills to communicate simple expressions in conversation with native speakers; skilfully use Pinyin; develop an understanding of elementary grammar and structures; and explore Chinese culture and society while learning the language, with opportunities to practice in class as well as in real life situations.

LNDN PSCI 3352 Syllabus

European Government and Politics

This course will explore the transformation of contemporary Europe by the European Union and competing political visions for the EU’s future. Students will investigate the impact of immigration and attitudes towards migrants, European ‘enlargement’, and the cultural politics of identity; examine Europe’s relationship with others outside the European region, the legacy of conflict between member states, and challenges offered by globalization to contemporary understandings of ‘Europe’; analyze a variety of case studies; and develop an understanding of globalization and the impact of diversity on the social dynamics of an urban environment such as London.

BCLA INTP 3348 Syllabus

Global Internship Course

The Global Internship Course is designed to be completed alongside an internship placement, allowing students to earn academic credit. Students will attend weekly, discussion-led sessions that include educational support and mentoring in a classroom environment; develop personal and professional skills; contextualize their internship experience socially and culturally; and employ Globally Networked Learning technology to conduct a comparative global analysis with other CAPA students. At times, this analysis will be facilitated through CAPA Masterclasses led by professionals in a diverse range of fields.

BCLA INTP 3347 Syllabus

Global Internship Course

The Global Internship Course is designed to be completed alongside an internship placement, allowing students to earn academic credit. Students will attend weekly, discussion-led sessions that include educational support and mentoring in a classroom environment; develop personal and professional skills; contextualize their internship experience socially and culturally; and employ Globally Networked Learning technology to conduct a comparative global analysis with other CAPA students. At times, this analysis will be facilitated through CAPA Masterclasses led by professionals in a diverse range of fields.

BCLA INTP 3347 Syllabus

Global Internship Course (3 credits)

The Global Internship Course is designed to be completed alongside an internship placement, allowing students to earn academic credit. Students will attend weekly, discussion-led sessions that include educational support and mentoring in a classroom environment; develop personal and professional skills; contextualize their internship experience socially and culturally; and employ Globally Networked Learning technology to conduct a comparative global analysis with other CAPA students. At times, this analysis will be facilitated through CAPA Masterclasses led by professionals in a diverse range of fields.

DBLN INTP 3347 Syllabus

Global Internship Course (3 credits)

The Global Internship Course is designed to be completed alongside an internship placement, allowing students to earn academic credit. Students will attend weekly, discussion-led sessions that include educational support and mentoring in a classroom environment; develop personal and professional skills; learn to contextualize their internship experience socially and culturally; and employ the use of Globally Networked Learning technology to conduct a comparative global analysis in collaboration with other CAPA students. At times, this analysis will be facilitated through CAPA Masterclasses led by professionals in a diverse range of fields.

BSAS INTP 3347 Syllabus

Global Internship Course (3 credits)

The Global Internship Course is designed to be completed alongside an internship placement, allowing students to earn academic credit. Students will attend weekly, discussion-led sessions that include educational support and mentoring in a classroom environment; develop personal and professional skills; contextualize their internship experience socially and culturally; and employ the use of Globally Networked Learning technology to conduct a comparative global analysis with other CAPA students. At times, this analysis will be facilitated through CAPA Masterclasses led by professionals in a diverse range of fields.

BSAS INTP 3348 Syllabus

Global Internship Course (6 credits)

The Global Internship Course is designed to be completed alongside an internship placement, allowing students to earn academic credit. Students will attend weekly, discussion-led sessions that include educational support and mentoring in a classroom environment; develop personal and professional skills; contextualize their internship experience socially and culturally; and employ the use of Globally Networked Learning technology to conduct a comparative global analysis with other CAPA students. At times, this analysis will be facilitated through CAPA Masterclasses led by professionals in a diverse range of fields.

DBLN INTP 3348 Syllabus

Global Internship Course (6 credits)

The Global Internship Course is designed to be completed alongside an internship placement, allowing students to earn academic credit. Students will attend weekly, discussion-led sessions that include educational support and mentoring in a classroom environment; develop personal and professional skills; learn to contextualize their internship experience socially and culturally; and employ the use of Globally Networked Learning technology to conduct a comparative global analysis in collaboration with other CAPA students. At times, this analysis will be facilitated through CAPA Masterclasses led by professionals in a diverse range of fields.

SDNY INTP 3347 Syllabus

Global Internship Course - Sydney 3 Credits

The Global Internship Course is designed to be completed alongside an internship placement, allowing students to earn academic credit. Students will attend weekly, discussion-led sessions that include educational support and mentoring in a classroom environment; develop personal and professional skills, contextualize their internship experience socially and culturally; and employ the use of Globally Networked Learning technology to conduct a comparative global analysis with other CAPA students. At times, this analysis will be facilitated through CAPA Masterclasses led by professionals in a diverse range of fields.

SDNY INTP 3348 Syllabus

Global Internship Course - Sydney 6 Credits

The Global Internship Course is designed to be completed alongside an internship placement, allowing students to earn academic credit. Students will attend weekly, discussion-led sessions that include educational support and mentoring in a classroom environment; develop personal and professional skills, contextualize their internship experience socially and culturally; and employ the use of Globally Networked Learning technology to conduct a comparative global analysis with other CAPA students. At times, this analysis will be facilitated through CAPA Masterclasses led by professionals in a diverse range of fields.

SHGH INTP 3347 Syllabus

Global Internship Course, Shanghai 3 Credit

The Global Internship Course is designed to be completed alongside an internship placement, allowing students to earn academic credit. Students will attend weekly, discussion-led sessions that include educational support and mentoring in a classroom environment; develop personal and professional skills; contextualize their internship experience socially and culturally; and employ the use of Globally Networked Learning technology to conduct a comparative global analysis with other CAPA students. At times, this analysis will be facilitated through CAPA Masterclasses led by professionals in a diverse range of fields.

SHGH INTP 3348 Syllabus

Global Internship Course, Shanghai 6 Credit

The Global Internship Course is designed to be completed alongside an internship placement, allowing students to earn academic credit. Students will attend weekly, discussion-led sessions that include educational support and mentoring in a classroom environment; develop personal and professional skills; contextualize their internship experience socially and culturally; and employ the use of Globally Networked Learning technology to conduct a comparative global analysis with other CAPA students. At times, this analysis will be facilitated through CAPA Masterclasses led by professionals in a diverse range of fields.

LNDN INTP 3347 Syllabus

Global Internship Course: London (3 credits)

The Global Internship Course is designed to be completed alongside an internship placement, allowing students to earn academic credit. Students will attend weekly, discussion-led sessions that include educational support and mentoring in a classroom environment; develop personal and professional skills, learn to contextualize their internship experience socially and culturally, and employ the use of Globally Networked Learning technology to conduct a comparative global analysis with other CAPA students. At times, this analysis will be facilitated through CAPA Masterclasses led by professionals in a diverse range of fields.

BCLA BUSN 3372 Syllabus

Global Marketing

This course will introduce the fundamentals of global marketing. Students will investigate the impact of an environment on a firm’s marketing strategy; explore the challenges of developing and implementing global marketing strategies that must navigate social, cultural, economic, and political specificities in individual areas; and develop an understanding of consumer behavior management. Students will also customize a product for entry into the international market, analyzing case studies as concrete examples before commencing this project.

LNDN HSCI/HIST 3121 Syllabus

Global Perspective on Nursing and Midwifery History

This course will explore the development of nursing practice from the perspectives of medical, nursing, and midwifery history. Students will explore the impacts of social change, evolving attitudes to care, and the role of the Enlightenment, French Revolution, and American Independence, as well as the transition from Agrarian to Industrial Society in shaping nursing care; consider contributions made by Florence Nightingale, Mary Seacole, and Mrs Bedford-Fenwick to nursing practice; examine the effect of religion, philosophy, ethics, law, sociology, and economics on clinical practice and the professional role and practice of nurses and midwives; and reflect on related historical changes.

LNDN INTR/PSCI 3355 Syllabus

Global Perspectives on Human Rights in Action

The notion of human rights has become central to global politics today. It is not a single subject but a broad field of potential investigation: this intensive seminar provides a multi-disciplinary introduction to the topic, critically examining the politics of human rights, their contentious nature and uneven global implementation. Throughout, the focus will be on practical issues and the contested politics of human rights in action through a range of topical case studies. Students will evaluate key debates about the politics and morality of human rights, analyze and explore the theoretical foundations of human rights concepts and topical issues relating to human rights from a variety of global, regional and local perspectives. The course critically examines the history and development of concepts of human rights and the philosophies underpinning them, as well as current frameworks of international human rights law and the relationship among current debates in human rights, political power and social injustice. Topics to be covered will include human rights and international relations; humanitarian intervention and the responsibility to protect; postcolonial and feminist critiques of human rights; the intersection of human rights with gender, sexuality, ethnicity and class; the relationship between human and civil rights; women's, children's and indigenous peoples'; rights; and the practical implementation and enforcement of human rights.

LNDN INTR/PSCI 3355 Syllabus

Global Perspectives on Human Rights in Action

This intensive seminar will focus on practical issues surrounding human rights. Students will examine politics and morality of human rights; analyze the theoretical foundations and development of human rights concepts, and the philosophies underpinning them; investigate frameworks of international human rights law; and explore London as a global centre for human rights advocacy, practice, and activism. Topics will include human rights and international relations; humanitarian intervention and the responsibility to protect; postcolonial and feminist critiques of human rights; the intersection of human rights with gender, sexuality, ethnicity, and class; the relationship between human and civil rights; women’s, children’s and indigenous peoples’ rights; and the practical implementation and enforcement of human rights.

SHGH URBS 3345 Syllabus

Globalization and Urbanization

This course will analyze China’s rapid urban transformation over the past six decades. Students will develop a critical understanding of China’s urbanization, social-spatial restructuring and the associated processes, forces, uniqueness, global impact, and complications, such as migration, citizenship and assimilation, urban land and housing issues, urban inequality and social discontent, and environmental issues; as well as assess the impact of socialist ideology, institutions, and globalization on Chinese urbanization.

SDNY SOCY 3358 Syllabus

Immigration: People Moving, Moving People

This course will explore the causes and consequences of migration for communities, personal identities, national identities, politics, ethics, and the environment. Students will examine various reasons for people-moving and moving people across borders; investigate the myths and controversies involved; develop an understanding of how notions of belonging, citizenship, nationality, nationhood, and ‘the other’ are constructed, proliferated, and manipulated; contextualize Australia’s involvement and reaction to immigration in a global schema; analyze related case studies drawn from both Australian and international examples; and participate in field trips.

BCLA BUSN 3370 Syllabus

Intercultural Management

This course will introduce the concepts and fundamentals of international management in a diverse and culturally complex workplace. Students will develop an understanding of the qualities and benefits of effective leadership, team dynamics, motivation, and power; examine cultural dynamics as they apply to intercultural work environments; explore methods for implementing management strategies, structures, and systems; and prepare themselves for future management roles that involve multicultural challenges.

SHGH CHIN 2210 Syllabus

Intermediate Chinese 3 Credit

This course is designed for students who already have completed an elementary level of Chinese language and can have basic daily conversations in Mandarin. Students will continue to improve their Mandarin levels in reading, writing, listening, and speaking in a collaborative learning environment; deepen their ability to communicate on topics surrounding daily life; gain insight into the historical and contextual background of the language; develop a deeper understanding of Chinese culture and society; and have opportunities to practice their language skills both in class and in real life situations.

DBLN BUSN 3371 Syllabus

International Business

This course will examine business environments in an international context, focusing specifically on Ireland and the European Union. Students will explore political, economic, and ethical contexts for policy and business operations and the cultural intricacies of international and global business; compare and contrast new knowledge with that of their existing understanding of business policy and practice in the United States; and develop broad perspectives required of successful managers working in an increasingly globalized world and workforce.

LNDN BUSN 3376 Syllabus

International Dimensions of Organizational Behavior

This course, based on interdisciplinary research, will examine how theories, research, and current issues in the field of organizational behavior apply in the context of the international workplace. Students will focus on the international application of core management theories and strategies; develop an understanding of human behavior within the setting of a global work environment, and across a variety of historical and current issues; reflect critically on how theoretical frameworks can be applied and developed within the organizational setting; and collaborate with CAPA Sydney students through CAPA’s Globally Networked Learning (GNL) technology.

BSAS BUSN 3374 Syllabus

International Economics

This course will investigate key economic issues in the global business environment. Students will analyze current real world evidence as well as recent academic and empirical findings in order to acquire an understanding of the impact that developments in economics, politics, and finance have on global businesses; and explore such topics as globalization, country differences, cross-border trade and investment, the global monetary system, and competing in a global marketplace.

SDNY BUSN 3374 Syllabus

International Economics

This course will examine key economic issues in the global business environment. Students will develop an understanding of how global businesses are impacted by real world developments in economics, politics, and finance; and explore such topics as globalization, country differences, cross-border trade and investment (both goods and services and capital and labor), the global finance architecture, and competing in a global marketplace, as well as two underlying themes evident throughout the module: contemporary context and localized content of the material.

BSAS BUSN 3373 Syllabus

International Finance

This course will explore theoretical concepts of finance and their adaptation to the international context. Students will develop an understanding of the opportunities and risks associated with international finance; examine such topics as historical perspectives, foreign exchange markets and exchange rate determination, exposure management, and financial management of multinational firms; and participate in topical discussions about the impact of economic and political developments on international finance.

BCLA BUSN 3373 Syllabus

International Finance

The International Finance module provides an understanding of finance in the international context. In a globally integrated world, it has become imperative to trade, invest and conduct business operations internationally. The course exposes the students to the opportunities and risks associated with international finance. As the world has become more integrated due to deregulation of financial markets, product innovation and technology, capital markets have kept pace with this integration. (Pending SOR approval)

LNDN BUSN 3372 Syllabus

International Marketing

This course will explore terms, concepts, and theories of marketing in the international context, as well as its scope and challenges. Students will examine the ways in which global dimensions technology, research, capital, investment, and production impact marketing, distribution, and communication networks; gain insight into the increasingly interdependent global economic and physical environment and its impact on international marketing; analyze current international marketing issues and their implications; and develop an understanding of how companies develop strategic plans that are competitive to survive and succeed in global markets.

LNDN ASTR 2239 Syllabus

Introduction to Astronomy

This course will introduce astronomy and astrophysics at the beginning undergraduate level and is intended for students that are majoring in science or engineering. Students will be assumed to have a broad familiarity with basic physical concepts such as force, energy, momentum, and temperature, as well as college level mathematics. Students will use algebra, geometry, and trigonometry extensively throughout the course, and to complete homework sets and exams. Familiarity with calculus will be very helpful, but it is not required. (Pending SOR approval)

BSAS SPAN 3312 Syllabus

Literature of the Americas (Spanish)

In this course, we'll explore some of the many literary forms writers invented to suit modern life in the hemisphere Europeans first called the New World. We will read the works of three poets (Whitman, Stein, Cesaire) and three fiction writers (McKay, Borges, Lispector). All of our writers conceived new styles and rhythms they believed emerged from and responded to a unique set of American conditions. These conditions included great possibilities - democracy, liberty, rights - and terrible abuses - slavery, colonialism, racism. To confront realities of this kind, these writers revitalized language, updated sound and sense, and reconceived literature's relationship to other human activities in original and powerful ways. As we read their sometimes weird, sometimes difficult poems and stories, we will ask how writers respond through formal experimentation to the urgent political and social questions life in the Americas raises. This course will be taught in Spanish.

SHGH BUSN 3380 Syllabus

Managing Global Supply Chains

This course will focus on issues within operations that are of relevance to a firm’s ability to remain competitive in a global economy. Students will explore legal, ethical, operational, venture risk, and reliability factors in addition to specialized topics in supply chain management within a global environment; investigate various ways analytical methods, tools, and technology are used within supply chain management; evaluate key decision criteria for sourcing and outsourcing in the supply chain; and develop a strategy for sustainability in the supply chain.

DBLN HIST 3313 Syllabus

Modern Irish History

This course will explore 20th and 21st century Irish history. Students will examine how the Irish Question (up to and including recent troubles and the peace process in the North, and the collapse of the Celtic Tiger economy in the South) has found artistic expression in film, theatre, visual arts, and music; and consider the use of evidence in the construction of the distinct, but overlapping, categories of history, memory, commemoration, and propaganda.

LNDN FILM 3377 Syllabus

Moving Image Editing: Theory and Practice

This course will introduce the theory, practice, and art of moving image editing. Students will explore historical accounts of editing practice, intertwined with media analysis; participate in practical exercises; and examine the key concepts that illuminate intersections between media and culture: conversation, gaze, action, persuasion, story, beat, humor, metaphor, and voice.

BCLA PSCI 3365 Syllabus

Nationalism in Comparative Perspective

This course will examine the relationship between states and nations, taking students on a deep dive into the state of nationalism in Spain, particularly in the Basque and Catalan regions. Students will explore the topic of nationalism as it manifests itself globally alongside other ideologies and attitudes, such as internationalism, racism, liberalism, and communism; and analyze specific case studies that demonstrate different contemporary types of nationalism as well as the types of institutions addressing the surrounding issues.

SDNY GEOG 3390 Syllabus

People, Place and Culture - Environmental Debates in Australia, New Zealand and Pacific

This course will explore the multi-faceted dimensions of human interaction with diverse environments in Australia, New Zealand, and the Pacific. Students will develop an understanding of the origins of environmental concerns and current debates in these regions from pre-European contact to the present day; focus on topics as broad as the peopling of the Pacific and the challenge of climate change to selected issues, such as the impact of mining, clean energy futures, our vulnerability to natural disasters, and increasing urbanization; and examine the intersection of culture and nature.

LNDN COLT 3311 Syllabus

Post-War British Pop Culture (short-term)

This course will look at some key theories of popular culture, and include case studies of selected examples from the British Isles since 1945. The main aim will be to enable students to think independently about this topic. It will compare British and American experiences of popular culture, the differences, similarities and cross-influences.

LNDN COLT 3311 Syllabus

Post-War British Pop Culture

This course will explore theories of popular culture from the British Isles, from 1945 through to the present day. Students will compare British and American experiences of popular culture, the differences, similarities, and cross-influences; examine countercultures and subcultures in Britain; explore their connections to music and political movements; develop an understanding of cultures that are based on ethnicity and sexuality, as well as concerns around diversity and related hate crime; and visit urban environments that will help contextualize these subcultures both historically and politically. This course is available both as a semester and a four-week summer intensive. Please note that the syllabus is for the full semester program. The syllabus for the four-week summer intensive is currently under development and will be available soon.

FLOR ARTH 3311 Syllabus

Renaissance Art History

This course will introduce a broad range of painting, sculpture, and architecture in Florence from the great projects of the Middle Ages that defined the religious and political centers of the city, with a special focus on major monuments of the Renaissance period. Students will examine issues of social, political, and economic context, as well their function, which was integral to artistic production of the period; conduct related scholarly research; deepen their appreciation of Renaissance civilization; and analyze the interrelationship between people’s creative achievements and their society.

SDNY GEOG/URBS 3350 Syllabus

Resilient Cities

This course is an introductory course on urban resilience and concepts in sustainability and its principles and the sustainable development of cities in the global, regional, and local contexts. The course will cover the environmental, socio-economic, and structural problems of contemporary cities and their consequences on natural systems and built communities. It provides a framework to examine the challenges of urbanism, issues facing cities and an opportunity to evaluate and explore “solutions”. (Pending SOR approval)

LNDN LITR 3312 Syllabus

Shakespeare and London

This course will explore a selection of Shakespeare’s plays to uncover his style and craft within the genres of comedy, history, and tragedy. Students will engage in Shakespeare's timelessness and learn to appreciate how vitally his ideas, themes, and concepts move from the concerns of his day to our own; develop skills of paraphrasing and textual analysis; analyze the relationship between plays; and examine the structure of different dramatic genres. Students will pay $70 for this course upon arrival in London, which pays for theater tickets.

BCLA FILM 3316 Syllabus

Spain as Seen Through Its Movies: 1980s to Today

This course will investigate the creation of contemporary identities through “Spanish” films and cinematic form. Students will critically examine the notion of a “national cinema”; the role cinema plays in constructing our stories; cinema’s impact on shifting ideas of what constitutes the human condition; and where and how issues of gender, sexuality, class, and ethnicity surface in cinematic articulations of the relationship between national identity, global trends, and personal history.

BCLA SPAN 1101 Syllabus

Spanish 101

This introductory course is designed for students who have never received formal Spanish instruction or who do not know any Spanish language. Students will develop Spanish communicative proficiency in four key areas: listening, speaking, reading, and writing; gain an awareness of Hispanic cultures; and have opportunities to practice Spanish language skills in real-world situations. The instructor will strive to use only Spanish as a means of communication, and students are expected to do the same.

BCLA SPAN 1102 Syllabus

Spanish 102

This course is designed for students who have successfully completed Spanish 101 or its equivalent. Students will develop Spanish communicative proficiency in four key areas: listening, speaking, reading, and writing; gain an awareness of Hispanic cultures; and have opportunities to practice Spanish language skills in real-world situations. The instructor will strive to use only Spanish as a means of communication, and students are expected to do the same.

BCLA SPAN 2201 Syllabus

Spanish 201

This course is designed for students with some prior knowledge of Spanish, who can already use basic words and phrases, and understand simple requests. By the end of this course, Students will have built a solid foundation in five key skill areas: intercultural communication, reading, writing, listening, and speaking, in order to accomplish a variety of everyday needs in the host culture. The instructor will strive to use only Spanish as a means of communication, and students are expected to do the same.

BCLA SPAN 2202 Syllabus

Spanish 202

El propósito principal de este curso es revisar y practicar ciertos puntos gramaticales del español. La práctica de esos puntos gramaticales se basará en actividades comunicativas que mejorarán las habilidades orales y escritas de los estudiantes. El estudio y práctica de estos puntos gramaticales se hará a través de varios medios (ej. la lectura de textos, tecnología, etc.) y usando diferentes metodologías. De esta se intentará cubrir las diferentes necesidades de los estudiantes y sus diferentes estilos de aprendizaje.

BSAS SPAN 3327

Spanish Refresh

This course, taught in Spanish, is designed for students at a higher-intermediate level. Students will gain conversational skills through discussion of contemporary topics from various sources. A complete syllabus will be available soon.

BSAS SPAN 3327

Spanish Refresh

This course, taught in Spanish, is designed for students at a higher-intermediate level. Students will gain conversational skills through discussion of contemporary topics from various sources. A complete syllabus will be available soon.

SDNY BUSN /COMM 3318 Syllabus

Sports as Soft Power

This course will examine sports as a soft power (persuasion, influence, and attraction) in the attempt to bridge communities and cultures locally, nationally, and globally. Students will analyze case studies demonstrating the effectiveness of using sports as part of a strategic communication plan by local, national, and international governments, and NGOs; investigate the role of sports in spontaneous grassroots movements; and develop an appreciation for the ability of sports to challenge or reinforce social and cultural values at the local, national, and international levels.

SDNY BUSN 3383 Syllabus

Sports Management

This course will introduce theories, concepts, knowledge, and skills for managers in commercialized and community-based sports in the Australian context. Students will develop an understanding of the range of challenges facing 21st century sports managers, including a complex socio cultural environment, competitive business markets, the management of a range of key stakeholders, the future of sports management, and strategic planning to meet future sporting organizations’ objectives; evaluate how public policy, sports governance, and legislative requirements impact on the management of sporting organizations; and explore Australia’s wider social utility of sports.

SDNY BUSN 3382 Syllabus

Sports Marketing

This course will examine the techniques and strategies of sports marketing. Students will explore the topics of professionalism and corporatization of sports; develop an awareness of the necessity of securing various revenue streams, including sponsorships, investment opportunities, government grants, and the fundraising potential of individuals, teams, clubs, and facilities; acquire knowledge of the promotion of sports through various traditional and digital marketing channels; and, using Australian case studies, develop and implement marketing strategies and plans.

BCLA ARTS 3307 Syllabus

The Experience of Photographing

This course will introduce the origins of photography, and explore digital photography techniques. Students will develop an understanding of how to create, print, and present an image; use manual and automatic camera modes; acquire knowledge of camera lenses and editing software; take photographs of their own; and critique the work of their peers. Students are expected to bring a digital camera and laptop with some means of editing. Note: Basic Photoshop will be available in the computer lab. (Pending SOR approval)

LNDN THTR 3310 Syllabus

Theater in the City

This course will place students at the heart of the experience of theater. Students will engage with the key ideas underpinning the creation of theatricality, and attend a range of different performances and tours of specific theater spaces. They will explore such topics as the qualities, conditions, and boundaries of drama, audience engagement, philosophical issues raised by the theatrical experience, the origins of theater, the changing roles of performers and spectators over time, and the theater's prospects in the 21st century. Students will pay $70 for this course upon arrival in London, which pays for theater tickets.

BCLA BUSN 3377 Syllabus

Transportation and Logistics Management

This course will provide the knowledge, skills, and tools for understanding core elements of logistics and transportation systems. Students will examine the dynamics of key logistics and transportation decisions, develop an understanding of best practices, and gain an appreciation for the challenges that typical companies face in managing their logistics and transportation network. (Pending SOR approval)

LNDN CWRT 3310 Syllabus

Travel Writing (short-term)

This course will introduce the art of travel writing. Students will explore nonfiction writing to represent the experience of travel and their personal encounters with diverse spaces and cultures; develop an understanding of the historical functions and meanings of “travel”; read a variety of texts focused on London and beyond, most by contemporary travel writers; stop, think about, reflect on, and process the experience of travel; employ the use of field notes and blogging in the travel writing process; and write about their own travels.

LNDN THTR 3314 Syllabus

Witchcraft and Magical Performance in London

This course will chart the representation of the occult in the city from the Early Modern period to the present day. Students will focus particularly on the performance and presentation of the occult and magical phenomena and its reception by the general public and social elites during specific time periods; develop an understanding of why magic has long been a subject of fascination; visit sites such as the Society for Psychical Research or the British Magic Circle; and attend a live performance of the magical or ghostly in London. Students will pay $40 for this course upon arrival in London, which pays for theater tickets.

BCLA CWRT 3317 Syllabus

Writing the City Barcelona

This course will explore the craft of creative writing in relation to the city and the particular challenges of writing about place. Students will examine different aspects of the city in relation to Barcelona narratives including travel, urban spaces, solitude, politics, ethnicity, and particular boroughs and characters (both fictional and real); and participate in both practical exercises and field work. (Pending SOR approval)

LNDN CWRT 3317 Syllabus

Writing the City: London

This course will introduce creative writing in relation to the city and the particular challenges of writing about place. Students will examine how various subjects such as the river, urban spaces, solitude, ethnicity, particular boroughs, and characters (both fictional and real) function in London narratives; develop an understanding of the role of memory and experience in literary psycho-geographical accounts of the metropolis; utilize their observations of London to practice creative writing; and investigate the potential of place within the narrative of various genres.

SDNY CWRT 3317 Syllabus

Writing the Global City - Sydney

This is a creative writing workshop. Students will explore creative writing in relation to the city and the particular challenges of writing about place; respond to their experience of Sydney through their own writing; evaluate and critique their work and that of others; read and discuss texts that focus on Australia in general and Sydney specifically, from both native and foreign perspectives; examine literary techniques and strategies used to express experiences and observations; and participate in walking tours of the city in order to acquire a sense of place.

FLOR CWRT 3317 Syllabus

Writing the Global City: Florence Reading and Creating Travel Writing

This is a creative writing workshop that will guide students to find their own voice in responding to the city of Florence and their experience of it, in either verse or prose texts. Students will read and discuss the work of Anglo-American writers who were influenced by the city and surrounding area of Tuscany; initiate, research, and write short stories, poetry, and non-fiction; and evaluate and critique their own work and that of their peers. Students will also participate in walking tours of the city and its outskirts.

LNDN PSCI 3121 Syllabus

Wrongful Conviction

This interactive course, taught by a law professor who has spent his career litigating wrongful conviction cases and directing the California Innocence Project, will introduce issues and case law related to wrongful convictions—a dynamic and important area of human rights law. Students will develop an understanding of basic procedural processes for litigating a wrongful conviction; debate policy issues behind police investigation procedures; investigate the leading causes of wrongful convictions; draft basic case briefs; and acquire knowledge of current best practices for identifications and obtaining confessions.